Stone Building


No idea whether this is a private villa or possibly a school of some type – it is quite a large building and doesn’t appear to be very accessible and is quite imposing.

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About SusieOfArabia

American woman now living in hubby's homeland of Saudi Arabia
This entry was posted in Architecture, Buildings, Photo, Saudi Arabia and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

6 Responses to Stone Building

  1. Jerry M says:

    I would agree with the first person who said it is hideous. (Well perhaps not hideous but not esthetically pleasing at all.) I looks like something cobbled together as opposed to a building designed with some idea of how it would look from the outside. I articles I read about Arab countries I often read descriptions of buildings that are plain on the outside but luxurious once inside. This isn’t ‘plain’ just ugly.

    • It seems that the theory of “less is more” is not that well known here in the Kingdom. So many things here are way too ornate or incorporate too much detail for my personal taste – in everything from clothing to furniture to architecture.

      • Jerry M says:

        Much of our architectural history is made from the study of buildings where the load bearing members are critical to the shape. So, we have churches with flying buttresses, or load bearing walls. Also most of our historical buildings have roofs of various shapes.

        Modern Saudi buildings appear to be steel frame construction. This encourages the building of simple boxes with flat roofs (wonder how they remove the water during the rare rain storms). Without any real creativity so many buildings are boxes with decorative facades. There is nothing wrong with this but it doesn’t lead to attractive buildings.

      • Many of the apartment buildings are exactly as you describe. My take on their construction is to imagine about five or six extra long railroad cars lined up side to side and more rows of the same stacked on top. There is not much creativity in these buildings and many of the rooms are long and narrow. Next time I’m up on one of the flat roofs of these buildings, I’ll try to notice if there are any drainage accommodations.

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