MyWorld: Seaside Picnic… in the Trunk


There are long stretches along the Red Sea coast here in Jeddah where there are no facilities provided for families who want to enjoy spending time by the sea. Some areas have shaded areas, walkways, benches, or ramadas with seating and seem to welcome visitors. Many other areas are not so inviting, but people make do with what they have. This family is parked on the Corniche, the winding roadway that runs along the Red Sea coastline for miles and miles. Since there are no facilities provided for them to utilize, they have opened up the trunk where the three children sitting inside are provided shade from the warm sun. Mom, dressed in black from head to toe, sits on a beach chair next to the car and in the minimal shade offered by the light pole behind her. Only the skin on her hands is showing. Many women here suffer from depression because of a Vitamin D deficiency due to a lack of exposure to sunlight. Dad rests on a carpet on the sidewalk with his back supported by the car. I think it’s sad that there aren’t more public facilities to encourage more people to enjoy being outdoors here. This is an all too common sight here in Jeddah.
Well, That’s My World for this week! That’s My World! offers a unique glimpse at life all over our planet. Take a peek at other people’s lives from all over the world by visiting That’s My World!

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About SusieOfArabia

American woman now living in hubby's homeland of Saudi Arabia
This entry was posted in Clothing, Culture, Life, Middle East, Nature, Photo, Saudi Arabia, Tradition and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to MyWorld: Seaside Picnic… in the Trunk

  1. B Squared says:

    So very, very different.

  2. Dina says:

    This is a super-interesting post and picture.

    I heard that in previous decades our desert Bedouin often got rickets from lack of sun exposure because they wore the long black clothing. But you say it also causes depression?? 😦

  3. zeal4adventure says:

    That’s making do with what you have indeed. In my country and many underdeveloped markets, creativity is the key. But I am a bit surprise to see this in Saudi as “ewok” wrote, they can easily afford it. Sad to know that too women are depressed because of vit d deficiency.

  4. Kids like to play and hide and be in fun, sometimes small spaces! Cute snap, Susie of Arabia!

  5. ewok1993 says:

    Really sad indeed especially since the Saudi govt can totally afford to give these facilities to its people.

    But again what a fabulous capture. A slice of Saudi life.

    Enjoy the new work week.

    • From what I understand, many projects are bought and paid for by the government but are not delivered by the contractor hired to do the job. This type of corruption lines the pockets of the unscrupulous businessmen and leaves the public high and dry. Things like this unfortunately happen everywhere…

  6. I’m always amazed when I read your posts about how women are treated. Don’t misunderstand me, I have no prejudice in regards to the Arab world, just think that for a country that has so much, how is it possible???? And I also know that the customs are very different from what I have grown up with — actually, you, too. Do you find it difficult to deal with? I know, I’m full of questions. Again, I don’t mean to be disrespectful, I’m just curious. Would still love to have an opportunity to sit down someday and just talk! Hope you have a great week, Susie!

    Sylvia

    • I guess you just have to understand that this is a totally male-dominated society, and the way most men see it, they are protecting and providing for their women. I do find some aspects of living here difficult to deal with – not having mobility or freedom of movement and not socializing with the opposite sex are probably my biggest gripes. Hopefully on my next visit to Washington, we can sit down and have that long cup of coffee together!

    • I guess you just have to understand that this is a totally male-dominated society, and the way most men see it, they are protecting and providing for their women. I do find some aspects of living here difficult to deal with – not having mobility or freedom of movement and not socializing with the opposite sex are probably my biggest gripes. Hopefully on my next visit to Washington, we can sit down and have that long cup of coffee together!

  7. Grami says:

    What a cheap and cheerful picnic for the kids!

    Seriously you touched on an important issue that is lack of facilities. The most annoying is absence of public toilets, everytime I go to the beach with my sisters I unevitably visit Starbucks’ family section even if I don’t feel like coffee

    • Thanks, Grami – I think it’s an area that could use much improvement too. Some of the areas that are equipped with ramadas and seating are nicely done, but there does seem to be a glaring lack of restrooms…

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